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Showing results 30 to 49 of 204
PreviewIssue DateTitleAuthor(s)
wm_Gates Railings Church of Ireland Rathfarnham 23.1.3.jpg.jpg1988 Gates Railings Church of Ireland Rathfarnham 23.1.3: remains of the previous Catholic church building with its medieval dedication to SS Peter and Paul can be found in the nearby graveyard. The present Anglican church which these gates serve, was completed in 1795 with extensions and renovations in 1821, 1852, 1889, 1994, 2001 and 2003.Healy, Patrick
wm_Gateway Bolton hall Ballyboden 23.1.20.jpg.jpg1988 Gateway Bolton hall Ballyboden 23.1.20: this detached five-bay, two storey Georgian house was built around 1818.Healy, Patrick
wm_Gateway St Endas harolds Grange 23.1.jpg.jpg1988 Gateway St Endas harolds Grange 23.1: the gateway probably dates from the construction of what originally was called the Hermitage in approximately 1780. Later from 1909 to 1932 Padraig Pearse's school St. Enda's was located here.Healy, Patrick
wm_Glassamucky St. Anne's Holy Well_2.jpg.jpg1988 Glassamucky St. Anne's Holy Well_1; Glassamucky St. Anne's Holy Well_2Healy, Patrick
wm_Glassavalaun St. Anne's Chapel and font.jpg.jpg1988 Glassavalaun St. Anne's Chapel and fontHealy, Patrick
wm_Glebe Esker Church Ruins 17.2.49.jpg.jpg1992 Glebe Esker Church Ruins 17.2.49: the church, dedicated originally to St Finian was recorded as ruinous by the seventeenth century. Surrounding it are gravestones from the early eighteenth to the late nineteenth century with yew trees completing the scene.Healy, Patrick
wm_Glebe Newcastle 22.1.3_2.jpg.jpg1988 Glebe Newcastle 22.1.3; Glebe Newcastle 22.1.3_1; Glebe Newcastle 22.1.3_2: constructed around 1720 with three bay, two storey extension one century later.Healy, Patrick
wm_Glebe Newcastle Medieval Church 22.1.6.jpg.jpg1988 Glebe Newcastle Medieval Church 22.1.6: this was described in a grant of Henry III in 1228 as the 'mother church of the King's manor of Newcastle' with dependant chapel in Colmanstown. One of the archdeacons of Glendalough depended upon altarages from Newcastle, Athgoe, Loughtown, and Colganstown and other revenues to a total of £46 10s at the time of the dissolution of St Patrick's Cathedral in 1547. Ruinous by the time of the Cromwellians wars, the present church was completed in 1788. Removed from the Archdeaconry of Glendalough in 1861, the church presently is part of the Anglican parish of Newcastle and Newtownmountkennedy with Calary. A chancel and vestry were added in 1821 and 1856, respectively.Healy, Patrick
wm_Glenarneen Brittas Dam Pond.jpg.jpg1988 Glenarneen Brittas Dam PondHealy, Patrick
7-Sep-2009 Glenasmole RoadsHealy, Patrick
wm_Grand Canal Gallanstown 1.2.181.jpg.jpg1988 Grand canal; Grand canal from Aylmer Bridge canal, towpaths, etc; Grand Canal Gallanstown 1.2.181Healy, Patrick
wm_Grange castle 18.2.4_3.jpg.jpg1988 Grange castle 18.2.4; Grange castle 18.2.4_3: this tower house was extended in the eighteenth century and only became ruinous in recent decades.Healy, Patrick
wm_Grifeen Bridge 17.2.36.jpg.jpg1988 Grifeen Bridge 17.2.36Healy, Patrick
wm_Grifeen House 17.2.36_1.jpg.jpg1988 Grifeen House 17.2.36; Grifeen House 17.2.36_1: Grifeen House 17.2.36; Grifeen House 17.2.36_1: correct spelling is Griffeen House and this eighteenth century house behind Courtney's Public House is located on Lock Road.Healy, Patrick
wm_Grifeen River 17.2.36_2.jpg.jpg1988 Grifeen River 17.2.36; Grifeen River 17.2.36_2Healy, Patrick
wm_Harold's Grange Small Tumulus 23.2.2_2.jpg.jpg1988 Harold's Grange Small Tumulus 23.2.2_1; Harold's Grange Small Tumulus 23.2.2_2Healy, Patrick
wm_Hazelhatch Road Bridge over Rail.jpg.jpg1988 Hazelhatch Road Bridge over RailHealy, Patrick
wm_Hellfire Club 1.1.26.jpg.jpg1988 Hellfire Club 1.1; Hellfire Club 1.1.26: In 1725 William 'Speaker' Connolly rebuilt a Neolithic passage tomb on Montpelier Hill as a hunting lodge using both a ready supply of stone on a hill not covered in bogland, and herds of red deer brought there originally by Normans. It later, after its sale on the death of Connolly in 1729, became a place for the meeting of the young men of the Hellfire Club. Stories of depravity and satanic rituals are associated with the place. The only death that can be securely associated with the place is that of Thomas Cobbe, son of the Archbishop of Dublin, who died there in 1751 after a duel. It was damaged by fire mid century and when another lodge was built downhill and further to the north, it was stripped of architectural stone work. It suffered from damage in the 1851 during the visit of Queen Victoria when burning barrels of tar were placed on the roof.Healy, Patrick
wm_Gateway Bolton hall Ballyboden 23.1.20.jpg.jpg1988 House Bolton Hall Ballyboden 23.1.20: gatway to a detached five-bay, two storey Georgian house was built around 1818.Healy, Patrick
wm_House Bolton Hall Ballyboden 23.1.20.jpg.jpg1988 House Bolton Hall Ballyboden 23.1.20: House Bolton Hall Ballyboden 23.1.20: this detached five-bay, two storey Georgian house was built around 1818.Healy, Patrick
Showing results 30 to 49 of 204