Home Current Normal Size Large Size High Contrast English Irish

Browsing by Author "Healy, Patrick"

Jump to: 0-9 A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z
or enter first few letters:   
Sort by: In order: Results/Page Authors/Record:
Showing results 55 to 74 of 204
PreviewIssue DateTitleAuthor(s)
wm_Kilakee Wedge Tomb in State Forest 1.2.249.jpg.jpg1988 Kilakee Wedge Tomb in State Forest 1.2.249Healy, Patrick
wm_Kilbride Church 18.2.jpg.jpg1988 Kilbride Church 18.2: this little chapel which lies in the middle of a small graveyard and lies between Baldonnel House and Casement Aerodrome. It was dedicated to St Bridget. It belonged to St Patrick's Cathedral and when that was dissolved in 1547 it was described as an old chapel, and together with a cottage had a value of some twelve pence per year, with another mention in 1660 over a dispute over land supposedly taken from the Cathedral by the owner of Kilbride.Healy, Patrick
wm_Kilininny Tower 20.1.17_2.jpg.jpg1988 Kilininny House and Tower 20; Kilininny Tower 20.1.17; Kilininny Tower 20.1.17_2: these remains were once part of the eighteenth century Allenton house, demolished in 1984, which also had until the 1950s the remains of an earlier house attached. The placename in Irish is 'Cill na n-Ingen' or church of the daughters as in early Christian times a monastery was founded there by the daughters of Maclair.Healy, Patrick
wm_Kilmaheddrick Church 18.2.5.jpg.jpg1988 Kilmahuddrick Church 18.2.5: this fifteenth century church belonged to the monks of the Abbey of the Blessed Virgin Mary, dissolved 1539, and was dedicated to St Cuthbert of Lindisfarne. It comprises nave and chancel with a broad arch. An early mention of the church comes in 1186 when one Master Osbertus of Clondalkin gives to the monks the lands of Balichelmer with the chapel and tithes there. After the dissolution of the monastery, the church and the parish of Newgrange was united to the Anglican parishes of Clondalkin and later Tallaght.Healy, Patrick
wm_Kilmateed House 18.2.33.jpg.jpg1988 Kilmateed 18; Kilmateed 18.2.33; Kilmateed 18.2.33_1; Kilmateed 18.2.33_2; Kilmateed 18.2.33_3; Kilmateed 18.2.33_4; Kilmateed House 18.2.33Healy, Patrick
wm_Kilmateed Old Mill 18.2.33.jpg.jpg1988 Kilmateed Mill and Pond 18.2; Kilmateed Old Mill 18.2.33Healy, Patrick
wm_Kiltalown House 21.2.8.jpg.jpg1985 Kiltalown House 21.2.8Healy, Patrick
wm_Kimmage Manor19.2.2.jpg.jpg1988 Kimmage Manor 19.2.2: Kimmage Manor was built sometime around 1890 by Sir Frederick Shaw, Recorder of Dublin from 1830, after whom Whitehall Road was once named, Recorder's Road, or Bothair an Racadair, still the modern name in Irish of the road. Sir Frederick Shaw died in 1876 and his son, the 4th Baronet, moved to Bushy Park House leasing the house to Erskine Chetwode for twenty one years. On its expiry in 1898 Mrs Mary Clayton leased the house in perpetuity. She sold up in 1911 to the Irish Province of the Holy Ghost Order. Extensions were added in 1914 and 1929 and the church was opened as a chapel of ease to Crumlin Parish in 1938. This now serves as a parish church to the more recent Kimmage parish. The original entrance was possibly along a lane that stretched as far as Presentation Convent Terenure, now Greenlea Road.Healy, Patrick
wm_kimmage Manor Staircase19.2.2.jpg.jpg1988 Kimmage Manor staircase 19.2.2: Kimmage Manor was built sometime around 1890 by Sir Frederick Shaw, Recorder of Dublin from 1830, after whom Whitehall Road was once named, Recorder's Road, or Bothair an Racadair, still the modern name in Irish of the road. Sir Frederick Shaw died in 1876 and his son, the 4th Baronet, moved to Bushy Park House leasing the house to Erskine Chetwode for twenty one years. On its expiry in 1898 Mrs Mary Clayton leased the house in perpetuity. She sold up in 1911 to the Irish Province of the Holy Ghost Order. Extensions were added in 1914 and 1929 and the church was opened as a chapel of ease to Crumlin Parish in 1938. This now serves as a parish church to the more recent Kimmage parish. The original entrance was possibly along a lane that stretched as far as Presentation Convent Terenure, now Greenlea Road.Healy, Patrick
wm_King John's Bridge Esker Lucan 17.2.48_1.jpg.jpg1992 King John's Bridge Esker Lucan 17.2.48_1Healy, Patrick
wm_King's Hospital School Brooklawn House 16.2.20.jpg.jpg1992 King's Hospital School Brooklawn House 16.2.20: built c 1750 with extension added c 1843.Healy, Patrick
wm_King's Hospital School Brooklawn House 16.2.20.jpg.jpg1988 King's Hospital School (Brooklawn House) back 16.2.20 built c 1750 with extension added c 1843.Healy, Patrick
wm_Knocklyon Castle 20.1.6_1.jpg.jpg1992 Knocklyon Castle 20.1.6_1: This country house of around 1840 is built around a three storey tower fifteenth tower house. It was built in the marches of the Pale to defend the Lordship against the raids of the O'Byrnes and O'Tooles. John Burnell was owner until 1575. Next John Bathe, Attorney General and later Chancellor of the Exchequer until 1586 was owned it. Captain Anthony Deering acquired it in 1586 when it was in a ruinous state. A reconstruction took place in 1620 when Adam Loftus, builder of Rathfarnham Castle leased it to Peirce Archibald. William 'Speaker' Connolly leased it in 1723 to the Ledwich family. Afterwards in 1826, it was purchased by the McGrane family who live there for close to a century. Finally the Shouldice family purchased in 1974 keeping the castle, but selling the surrounding land for housing.Healy, Patrick
wm_Knocklyon Castle 20.1.6_2.jpg.jpg1992 Knocklyon Castle 20.1.6_2: This country house of around 1840 is built around a three storey tower fifteenth tower house. It was built in the marches of the Pale to defend the Lordship against the raids of the O'Byrnes and O'Tooles. John Burnell was owner until 1575. Next John Bathe, Attorney General and later Chancellor of the Exchequer until 1586 was owned it. Captain Anthony Deering acquired it in 1586 when it was in a ruinous state. A reconstruction took place in 1620 when Adam Loftus, builder of Rathfarnham Castle leased it to Peirce Archibald. William 'Speaker' Connolly leased it in 1723 to the Ledwich family. Afterwards in 1826, it was purchased by the McGrane family who live there for close to a century. Finally the Shouldice family purchased in 1974 keeping the castle, but selling the surrounding land for housing.Healy, Patrick
wm_Knocklyon Castle 20.1.6.jpg.jpg1988 Knocklyon Castle 20.1.6: This country house of around 1840 is built around a three storey tower fifteenth tower house. It was built in the marches of the Pale to defend the Lordship against the raids of the O'Byrnes and O'Tooles. John Burnell was owner until 1575. Next John Bathe, Attorney General and later Chancellor of the Exchequer until 1586 was owned it. Captain Anthony Deering acquired it in 1586 when it was in a ruinous state. A reconstruction took place in 1620 when Adam Loftus, builder of Rathfarnham Castle leased it to Peirce Archibald. William 'Speaker' Connolly leased it in 1723 to the Ledwich family. Afterwards in 1826, it was purchased by the McGrane family who live there for close to a century. Finally the Shouldice family purchased in 1974 keeping the castle, but selling the surround land for housing.Healy, Patrick
wm_Knocklyon House 20.1.7.jpg.jpg1992 Knocklyon House 20.1.7: Knocklyon Road. Built sometime between 1830 and 1860. Appears on the Ordinance Survey of 1843 with the Griffith's Valuation listing its owner as Daniel P. Ryan. Extended in 1951 by its owner JH Griffen, it was owned by Captain Freeman Spencer until his death in 1982. Presently used as the Rutland Centre for the treatment of addiction.Healy, Patrick
wm_Lead and Copper Mill 16.2.jpg.jpg1992 Lead and Copper Mill 16.2: actually pump house of c. 1830 in Palmerston (or Palmerstown) that pumped water to Farmleigh water tower and now print ink factory.Healy, Patrick
wm_Lead Copper Mill 16.2.24_1.jpg.jpg1992 Lead Copper Mill 16.2.24_1: actually pump house of c. 1830 in Palmerston (or Palmerstown) that pumped water to Farmleigh water tower and now print related facility.Healy, Patrick
wm_Lead and Copper Mill 16.2.jpg.jpg1992 Lead Copper Mill 16.2.24: actually pump house of c. 1830 in Palmerston (or Palmerstown) that pumped water to Farmleigh water tower and now print related facility.Healy, Patrick
wm_Leixlip Bridge 17.2.10.jpg.jpg1992 Leixlip Bridge 17.2.10Healy, Patrick
Showing results 55 to 74 of 204